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Putting it all Together

Consider the following when assembling your business plan:

Format and Design

Keep it easy to read. Don’t try to impress your reader with too many fancy fonts and multi-colored graphics. An easy-to-read font and a simple design will work best. A 12-point font in a serif style, such as Times, is the easiest for most people to read.

Keep it simple. Avoid using all caps and excessive use of bold or underlining. Gimmicks detract from the importance or significance of what is said. If a corporate identity has already been established, the chosen logo, fonts, and color scheme should be used.

Use adequate white space. There should be white space on each page. This not only makes the text easier to read but provides a place for taking notes. White space can be added by using wide margins (between 1 and 1.25 inches) and bulleted lists of information, whenever possible.

Add titles and graphics when appropriate. Titles, graphs, and other appropriate graphics add interest and readability to the plan.

Number the pages. Each page should be numbered.

Printing and Binding

Make a quality printout. Use a high-quality laser printer and white or light-colored, standard size paper, 8.5 x 11 inches.

Make a PDF. You can also share your business plan electronically by creating a pdf file or by sharing the word processing document.

Use color effectively. Color can be used effectively for headings, subheadings, and graphs. The main text should not be printed in color. Too much color can detract from the content of your plan.

Use a binding. When printing, a binding that secures the pages and makes it easy to flip should be used. Three-ring binders or paper folders work well for business plans that will be used internally. This type of binding will allow for easy removal or replacement of pages as your business plan is continually updated.

Consider the following when assembling your business plan:

Format and Design

Keep it easy to read. Don’t try to impress your reader with too many fancy fonts and multi-colored graphics. An easy-to-read font and a simple design will work best. A 12-point font in a serif style, such as Times, is the easiest for most people to read.

Keep it simple. Avoid using all caps and excessive use of bold or underlining. Gimmicks detract from the importance or significance of what is said. If a corporate identity has already been established, the chosen logo, fonts, and color scheme should be used.

Use adequate white space. There should be white space on each page. This not only makes the text easier to read but provides a place for taking notes. White space can be added by using wide margins (between 1 and 1.25 inches) and bulleted lists of information, whenever possible.

Add titles and graphics when appropriate. Titles, graphs, and other appropriate graphics add interest and readability to the plan.

Number the pages. Each page should be numbered.

Printing and Binding

Make a quality printout. Use a high-quality laser printer and white or light-colored, standard size paper, 8.5 x 11 inches.

Make a PDF. You can also share your business plan electronically by creating a pdf file or by sharing the word processing document.

Use color effectively. Color can be used effectively for headings, subheadings, and graphs. The main text should not be printed in color. Too much color can detract from the content of your plan.

Use a binding. When printing, a binding that secures the pages and makes it easy to flip should be used. Three-ring binders or paper folders work well for business plans that will be used internally. This type of binding will allow for easy removal or replacement of pages as your business plan is continually updated.